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November Information Session

November 22, 2013

3PM-5PM

14N-112 (map: http://whereis.mit.edu/?go=14)

Light refreshments provided. Learn about the Science Writing program, meet faculty and ask questions!

http://whereis.mit.edu/?go=14

Registration is free, but please RSVP using the form below.

October 2013 Information Session

October 25, 2013

3PM-5PM

14N-112 (map: http://whereis.mit.edu/?go=14)

Light refreshments provided.  Learn about the Science Writing program, meet faculty and ask questions!

http://whereis.mit.edu/?go=14

Registration is free, but please RSVP using the form below.

Thesis Day 2013

Thesis_2013

Emily Anthes Book Talk

emily_anthesEmily Anthes, author of “Frankenstein’s Cat: Cuddling up to Biotech’s Brave New Beasts” will speak at MIT on April 18 at 7:00 PM in 56-114.

Come hear about her adventures with GloFish, bioengineered goats that produce life-saving medicine in their milk, cloned cats (and dogs!), cyborg beetles, and her dog Milo.

The event is free and open to the public.

 

 

 

Hear Tom Levenson interview Emily on Blog Talk Radio:

 

November Information Session

November 16, 2012
3-5 PM
Come meet faculty, learn about the MIT Graduate Program in Science Writing, and ask questions.
Light refreshments provided.
If you’re intersted in attending, please register using the ticket form beloow.

October Information Session

October 19, 2012
3-5 PM
Come meet faculty, learn about the MIT Graduate Program in Science Writing and ask questions.
Light refreshments provided.
If you’re interested in attending, please register using the ticket form below.

Matthew Hutson Reading at MIT

Author Matthew Hutson will do a reading/discussion on his book “The 7 Laws of Magical Thinking: How Irrational Beliefs Keep Us Happy Healthy and Sane” at MIT, followed by Q&A.

Free and open to the public.  Books will be available for purchase at the event.

Read about the book here:  http://magicalthinkingbook.com

When? May 14 7:00 pm
Where? Stata Center at MIT, 32-141

Did you miss seeing Matthew live?  Watch the event below!

MIT Tech TV

Marcia Bartusiak Reads At Cambridge Science Festival

On April 26, Professor Marcia Bartusiak will participate in “Dramatic 2-minute-long readings from bizarre studies and patents that resulted in Ig Nobel Prizes, recited by an all-star cast of scientists, journalists, and other enlightening entertainers.”  The event is part of the Cambridge Science Festival and is sponsored by the Annals of Improbable Research.

Where: Voltage Coffee & Art, 295 Third Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
When: 6:00 pm, Thursday, April 26, 2012
This event is free.

Neal Stephenson at MIT

Neal Stephenson

April 17, 2012 4-5:30
Jason Pontin, Editor in Chief of MIT Technology Review, will conduct a wide-ranging but informal conversation with science fiction writer Neal Stephenson about his craft, preoccupations, influences, and inspirations. Among the issues they’ll discuss: the state and future of hard science fiction and how e-readers are influencing novels. At the end of an hour-long conversation with Pontin, Stephenson will take 30 minutes of questions from the audience. The event will be video taped and an edited version of the interview will appear in the 2012 edition of Technology Review’s annual science fiction special issue, TRSF.

Hosted by Technology Review with assistance from the MIT Graduate Program in Science Writing. Plan to arrive at 3:30 p.m. The program will commence at 4:00 p.m.

The event is free, but seating will be limited, so get your tickets now at http://nealstephenson.eventbrite.com/.

Science Writing for Scientists

Science Writing for Scientists

Enrollment limited: advance sign up required (see contact below)
Signup by: 09-Jan-2012
Limited to 30 participants.
Participants requested to attend all sessions (non-series)
Prereq: Paragraph describing why the student wishes to participate

This class will lead its participants through the journey from facts into story as they learn how to communicate science in ways a broad public audience will engage and remember.
This class introduces participants to the key steps involved in presenting complicated ideas in an accurate and memorable fashion. In the first session we will cover what elements make excellent science writing for the public: structure, metaphor as a tool, translation of complexity, accuracy while simplifying, and the art of triage – telling your audience what it needs to know to grasp your material, but not everything that you know.
Students will discuss a series of research findings and background materials, and transform them into a short popular piece. Those pieces will be workshopped until the participants grasp the idea of story, as opposed to report, down to the bone.
The class will be led by the New York Times bestselling science writer Seth Mnookin, and by Peabody and National Academies award-winning writer and film maker Thomas Levenson, head of 21W.

Paragraphs may be sent to sciwrite-www@mit.edu.